“30 Rock” is Ending and I Seriously Can’t Deal.

31 Jan

I was in high school when NBC introduced us to Liz Lemon and the cast and crew of “TGS With Tracy Jordan.” Oh boy, just writing that first sentence is getting me choked up. This is going to be hard.

Everyone that knows me knows my affinity for “30 Rock,” whose series finale- after seven beautiful years- is tonight. I’ve become the person that constantlytumblr_lpzmg1mY0y1qzdgq9o1_400 receives links, texts about news, random “Blerg” e-mails and comments (the condolence letters have been non-stop today). I wear my TGS With Tracy Jordan sweatshirt on a way-too-regular basis. I’ve seen all the seasons at least 6 times, which means of course I can quote any episode at any time. And I love it.

It isn’t easy to talk about a television show with such sincerity without sounding tacky or over-the-top. Obviously it is a downright hilarious show, with a story line that is pretty addicting and easy to follow. It’s also smart comedy that allows viewers like me to laugh at our own ridiculous personalities and quirks.

But there is a sentimentality that I feel towards the characters of “30 Rock” that I honestly can’t over-embellish. Being a comedy-nerd there were always shows out there that I loved to watch, from Saturday Night Live to Arrested Development and Parks and Recreation. But now I’m in my mid-20’s, and through it all no characters ever really grew up as I did. They were there tinafeythrough such monumental moments in my life: graduating from college, the awful post-college job interviews and subsequent rejections, landing my first full-time job. Things may have been changing all over the place, but through it all I had the chance to tune it all out once a week with Liz, Jack and a glass of Funky Juice.

I also respect the crap out of Tina Fey, my homegirl and the first female head writer on Saturday Night Live. Growing up I would act out the SNL skits from that week in my basement and subject my friends to stand-up routines at sleepovers. I learned about television comedy and fell in love with its complexities- and its ability to still be funny within the restraints of public broadcasting- because of women like her.

I know it’s corny, but I am not ready to see “30 Rock” go. I don’t want to say goodbye to the characters or the stories or the comfort I feel when I watch it. I am freaking out a lot. There will be a lot of tears at it’s end, and a whole lot of moping tomorrow.

Blerg.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: